segunda-feira, 29 de dezembro de 2008

We Will All Be Telepathic in 25 Years

By Mukul Sharma

Does telepathy exist? The majority of mainstream scientists believe that the paranormal acquisition of information concerning the thoughts, feelings or activity of another person is a lot of poppycock.

But it doesn't really matter because the majority of mainstream scientists also believe telepathy's going to exist in the future, thanks to technology.

According to one World Future Society forecast, wireless technology will be incorporated into our thought processing by 2030.

In the next 25 years, we'll learn how to augment our 100 trillion relatively slow inter-neuronal connections with high-speed virtual connections via nanorobotics.

This will allow us to greatly boost our pattern-recognition abilities, memories, and overall thinking capacity, as well as to directly interface with powerful forms of computer intelligence and with each other.

Which means we'll also be able to move beyond the brain's present performance capacity. Researchers have already demonstrated that with the help of wired implants it's possible for a person to move a cursor on a computer screen just by thinking about it.

How long before such developments become non-invasive and wireless and the inter-face involves two or more human beings communicating by thought alone?

Instead of telepathy, they're calling it "techlepathy" and, initially, first generation devices will be unidirectional.

That is, the neural patterns of unspoken words would be transmitted to the other person before receiving the other person's transmission in return, much like how walkie-talkies work.

Later, the pre-speech thought patterns themselves would be transmitted. Ultimately, the transference will become seamlessly bi-directional and would include other non-verbal signals such as consciousness and emotions.

By then it could also involve one or more persons or, indeed, as many as possible like an Internet of connected minds.

Some experts in fact believe techno-enabled telepathy will become the sole or at least the primary form of human communication in the future and everybody will make use of it for economic and social reasons once it becomes available to all.

Also, being technology driven and not some spooky psychic phenomenon, privacy issues would not be a problem as personal firewalls could be created to restrict any unwanted intrusion.

Yes, there'll be hackers going in-mind from time to time and mind-bloggers going openly public but, in general, techlepathy should be as safe as having a mobile phone inside one's head.


Half-Man, Half-Machine: The Mind of the Future


5 Psychological Experiments That Prove Humanity is Doomed

by Alexandra Gedrose

Psychologists know you have to be careful when you go poking around the human mind because you're never sure what you'll find there. A number of psychological experiments over the years have yielded terrifying conclusions about the subjects.

Oh, we're not talking about the occasional psychopath who turns up. No, we're talking about you. The experiments speak for themselves:

#5. The Asch Conformity Experiment (1953)

The Setup:
Solomon Asch wanted to run a series of studies that would document the power of conformity, for the purpose of depressing everyone who would ever read the results.

Subjects were told that they would be taking part in a vision test, along with a handful of people. The participants were then shown pictures, and individually asked to answer very simple and obvious questions. The catch was that everybody else in the room other than the subject was in on it, and they were were told to give obviously wrong answers. So would the subject go against the crowd, even when the crowd was clearly and retardedly wrong?

The Result:
Questions the subjects were asked were like the puzzle shown here:

All they had to do was say which line on the right matched the one on the left. As you can see, Asch wasn't exactly asking these people to design the next space station. Really, the only way you could get the line questions honestly wrong is if you took two doses of LSD that morning and rubbed them directly on your eyeballs (which would have made for an even more awesome experiment, but we're getting off the point).

Yet, sadly, 32 percent of subjects would answer incorrectly if they saw that three others in the classroom gave the same wrong answer. Even when the line was plainly off by a few inches, it didn't matter. One in three would follow the group right off the proverbial cliff.

What This Says About You:

Imagine how much that 32 percent figure inflates when the answers are less black and white. We all tend to laugh with the group even when we didn't get the joke, or doubt our opinion we realize ours is unpopular among our group. So much for those lectures you got in elementary school about peer pressure and "being brave enough to be yourself."

"Well, it's a good thing I'm a rebellious non-conformist," many of you are saying. Of course, for virtually all of you, the next step is to find out what the other non-conformists are doing ...

... and make sure you conform to it perfectly.

"Wait, you're right! Surely we must rebel against this mindless herd mentality! Let's all take to the streets!"

#4. The Good Samaritan Experiment (1973)

The Setup:

The Biblical story of the Good Samaritan, if you hadn't heard, is about a passing Samaritan helping an injured man in need, while other, self-righteous types walk right on by. Psychologists John Darley and C. Daniel Batson wanted to test if religion has any effect on helpful behavior.

Their subjects were a group of seminary students. Half of the students were given the story of the Good Samaritan and asked to perform a sermon about it in another building. The other half were told to give a sermon about job opportunities in a seminary.

As an extra twist, subjects were given different times that they had to deliver the sermon so that some would be in a hurry and others not.

Then, on the way to the building, subjects would pass a person slumped in an alleyway, who looked to be in need of help. We like to think Darley and Batson beat the crap out of some random dude to make it more realistic, but sources say otherwise.

C. Daniel Batson probably did not beat a homeless dude

The Result:

The people who had been studying the Good Samaritan story did not stop any more often than the ones preparing for a speech on job opportunities. The factor that really seemed to make a difference was how much of a hurry the students were in.

In fact, if pressed for time, only 10 percent would stop to give any aid, even when they were on their way to give a sermon about how awesome it is for people to stop and give aid. Though to be fair, if you were late for a class, did your professor ever accept, "I had to stop and help a wounded traveler" as an excuse? Probably not unless you could produce the guy's blood-stained shirt as evidence.

What This Says About You:

As much as we like to make fun of, say, anti-gay congressmen who get caught gaying it up in a men's bathroom and pointing out Al Gore's resource-hogging mansion ...

... the truth is us common folk are just as likely to be hypocrites as the politicians. After all, it's much easier to talk to a room full of people about helping strangers than, say, actually touching a smelly and bleeding homeless man. So even pointing out their hypocrisy becomes a form of hypocrisy.

And in case you thought these results were just restricted to hypocritical seminary students, turn on the news. Remember a few years ago when cameras captured at least a dozen cars refusing to stop for an injured woman laying in the road?

Just like the students, they all had to be somewhere. The drivers were presumably proud enough of themselves just for swerving to miss her, rather than squishing her like roadkill.

Which brings us to ...

#3. Bystander Apathy Experiment (1968)

The Setup:

When a woman was murdered in 1964, newspapers printed that 38 people had heard and seen the attack, but did nothing. John Darley and Bibb Latane wanted to know if the fact that these people were in a large group played any role in the reluctance to come to aid.

The two psychologists invited volunteers to take part in a discussion. They claimed that because the discussion would be extremely personal (probably asking about the size of their genitals or something) individuals would be separated in different rooms and talk to each other using an intercom.

During the conversation, one of the members would fake an epileptic seizure, which could be heard on the speakers. We're not completely sure how they conveyed over the intercom that what was happening was a seizure, but we're assuming the words "Wow this is quite an epileptic seizure I'm having" were uttered.

The Result:

When subjects believed that they were the only other person in the discussion, 85 percent were heroic enough to leave the room and seek help once the other began the fake seizure. This makes sense. Having an extremely personal conversation (again, presumably about tiny genitalia) with another person is difficult enough, but being forced to continue to carry on the conversation by yourself is just sad. But either way, 85 percent helped. So that's good, right?

Well, they weren't done. When the experiment was altered so that subjects believed four other people were in the discussion, only 31 percent went to look for help once the seizure began. The rest assumed someone else would take care of it. So the phrase, "The more, the merrier" somehow got lost in translation because the correct expression should be, "The more, the higher probability that you will die if you have a seizure."

Anyone can have epilepsy, according to this child's drawing

What This Says About You:

Obviously if there's an emergency and you're the only one around, the pressure to help out increases massively. You feel 100 percent responsible for what happens. But, when you're with 10 other people, you're only 10 percent as responsible. The problem is everybody else only feels 10 percent responsible too.

This sheds some light on our previous examples. Maybe the drivers who swerved around the injured woman in the road would have stopped if they'd been alone on a deserted highway. Then again, maybe they'd be even more likely to abandon her since they know nobody is watching (unlike the people in the experiment, who at least knew there were others around to judge their actions).

Or maybe it comes down to just how plausible an excuse we can make for ourselves. "Surely someone will come along and save the lady in the road," we say. Or, "Surely someone else will do something about the environment," or "Surely the shark will get full and stop eating that dude at some point." We just need the slightest excuse to do nothing.

#2. The Stanford Prison Experiment (1971)

The Setup:

Psychologist Philip Zimbardo wanted to find out how captivity affects authorities and inmates in prison. Sounds innocent enough. Seriously, what could go wrong?

Zimbardo transformed the Stanford Psychology Department's basement into a mock prison. Subjects volunteered by simply responding to a newspaper ad ...

Not the actual ad

... and then passing a test proving good health and high-quality mental stability, which are very important factors in deciding who goes to prison. These volunteers were all male college students who were then divided arbitrarily into 12 guards and 12 prisoners. Zimbardo himself decided that he wanted to play too, and elected himself Prison Superintendent. The simulation was planned to run for two weeks.

Yep, nothing at all can go wrong with this.

The Result:

It took about one day for every subject to suddenly go as insane as a shit-house rat. On only the second day, prisoners staged a riot in the faux detention center, with prisoners barricading their cells with their beds and taunting the guards. The guards saw this as a pretty good excuse to start squirting fire extinguishers at the insurgents because, hey, why the hell not?

From that point on, the Stanford Prison that had already gone to hell, just continued to ricochet around in hell for day after day. Some guards began forcing inmates to sleep naked on the concrete, restricting the bathroom as a privilege (one that was often denied). They forced prisoners to do humiliating exercises and had them clean toilets with their bare hands.

Incredibly, when "prisoners" were told they had a chance at parole, and then the parole was denied, it didn't occur to them to simply ask out of the damned experiment. Remember they had absolutely no legal reason to be imprisoned, it was just a damned role-playing exercise. This fact continued to escape them as they sat naked in their own filth, with bags on their heads.

Over 50 outsiders had stopped to observe the prison, but the morality of the trial was never questioned until Zimbardo's girlfriend, Christina Maslach, strongly objected. After only six days, Zimbardo put a halt to the experiment (several of the "guards" expressed disappointment at this). If you were about to applaud Maslach as the only sane person involved in this clusterfuck, you should know that she went on to marry Zimbardo, the guy who orchestrated the whole thing.

What This Says About You:

Ever been harassed by a cop who acted like a major douchebag, pushing you around for no reason? Science says that if the roles were reversed, you'd likely act the same way.

As it turns out, it's usually fear of repercussion that keeps us from torturing our fellow human beings. Give us absolute power over somebody and a blank check from our superiors, and Abu Ghraib-esque naked pyramids are sure to follow. Hey, if it can happen to a bunch of Vietnam-era hippie college students, it sure as hell could happen to you.

#1.The Milgram Experiment (1961)

The Setup:

When the prosecution of the Nazis got underway at the Nuremberg Trials, many of the defendants' excuse seemed to revolve around the ideas of, "I'm not really a prick" and, "Hey man, I was just following orders." Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram wanted to test willingness of subjects to obey an authority figure. Maybe he could just, you know, ask people? Oh, hell no. That would not be nearly horrifying enough.

Instead he ran an experiment where the subject was told he was a "teacher" and that his job was to give a memory test to another subject, located in another room. The whole thing was fake and the other subject was an actor.

The subject was told that whenever the other guy gave an incorrect answer, he was to press a button that would give him an electric shock. A guy in a lab coat was there to make sure he did it (again no real shock was being delivered, but the subject of course did not know this).

The subject was told that the shocks started at 45 volts and would increase with every wrong answer. Each time they pushed the button, the actor on the other end would scream and beg for the subject to stop.

So, can you guess how this went?

The Result:

Many subjects began to feel uncomfortable after a certain point, and questioned continuing the experiment. However, each time the guy in the lab coat encouraged them to continue. Most of them did, upping the voltage, delivering shock after shock while the victim screamed. Many subjects would laugh nervously, because laughter is the best medicine when pumping electrical currents through another person's body.

Eventually the actor would start banging on the wall that separated him from the subject, pleading about his heart condition. After further shocks, all sounds from victim's room would cease, indicating he was dead or unconscious. If you had to guess, what percentage of the subjects kept delivering shocks after that point?

Five percent? Ten?

Between 61 and 66 percent of subjects would continue the experiment until it reached the maximum voltage of 450, continuing to deliver shocks after the victim had been zapped into unconsciousness or the afterlife. Repeated studies have shown the same result: Subjects will mindlessly deliver pain to an innocent stranger as long as a dude in a lab coat says it's OK.

Most subjects wouldn't begin to object until after 300-volt shocks. Zero of them asked to stop the experiment before that point (keep in mind 100 volts is enough to kill a man, in some cases).

What This Says About You:

You might like to think of yourself as a free-thinking marauder, but when it comes down to it, odds are you won't stick it to The Man because of the fear The Man will stick it right back up your ass. And this was just a guy in a lab coat--imagine if he'd had a uniform, or a badge.

Charles Sheridan and Richard King took this experiment one step further, but asked subjects to shock a puppy for every incorrect action it made. Unlike Milgram's experiment, this shock was real. Exactly 20 out of 26 subjects went to the highest voltage.

Almost 80 percent. Think about that when you're walking around the mall: Eight out of ten of those people you see would torture the shit out of a puppy if a dude in a lab coat asked them to.


Prozac, used by 40m people, does not work say scientists

26 February 2008
by Sarah Boseley

Analysis of unseen trials and other data concludes it is no better than placebo
Full text: the PLoS paper

Prozac, the bestselling antidepressant taken by 40 million people worldwide, does not work and nor do similar drugs in the same class, according to a major review released today.

The study examined all available data on the drugs, including results from clinical trials that the manufacturers chose not to publish at the time. The trials compared the effect on patients taking the drugs with those given a placebo or sugar pill.

When all the data was pulled together, it appeared that patients had improved - but those on placebo improved just as much as those on the drugs.

The only exception is in the most severely depressed patients, according to the authors - Prof Irving Kirsch from the department of psychology at Hull University and colleagues in the US and Canada. But that is probably because the placebo stopped working so well, they say, rather than the drugs having worked better.

"Given these results, there seems little reason to prescribe antidepressant medication to any but the most severely depressed patients, unless alternative treatments have failed," says Kirsch. "This study raises serious issues that need to be addressed surrounding drug licensing and how drug trial data is reported."

The paper, published today in the journal PLoS (Public Library of Science) Medicine, is likely to have a significant impact on the prescribing of the drugs. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) already recommends that counselling should be tried before doctors prescribe antidepressants. Kirsch, who was one of the consultants for the guidelines, says the new analysis "would suggest that the prescription of antidepressant medications might be restricted even more".

The review breaks new ground because Kirsch and his colleagues have obtained for the first time what they believe is a full set of trial data for four antidepressants.

They requested the full data under freedom of information rules from the Food and Drug Administration, which licenses medicines in the US and requires all data when it makes a decision.

The pattern they saw from the trial results of fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Seroxat), venlafaxine (Effexor) and nefazodone (Serzone) was consistent. "Using complete data sets (including unpublished data) and a substantially larger data set of this type than has been previously reported, we find the overall effect of new-generation antidepressant medication is below recommended criteria for clinical significance," they write.

Two more frequently prescribed antidepressants were omitted from the study because scientists were unable to obtain all the data.

Concerns have been raised in recent years about the side-effects of this class of antidepressant. Evidence that they could prompt some young people to consider suicide led to a warning to doctors not to prescribe them for the under-18s - with the exception of Prozac, which was considered more effective than the rest.

In adults, however, the depression-beating benefits were thought to outweigh the risks. Since its launch in the US in 1988, some 40 million people have taken Prozac, earning tens of billions of dollars for the manufacturer, Eli Lilly. Although the patent lapsed in 2001, fluoxetine continues to make the company money - it is now the active ingredient in Sarafem, a pill sold by Lilly for premenstrual syndrome.

Eli Lilly was defiant last night. "Extensive scientific and medical experience has demonstrated that fluoxetine is an effective antidepressant," it said in a statement. "Since its discovery in 1972, fluoxetine has become one of the world's most-studied medicines. Lilly is proud of the difference fluoxetine has made to millions of people living with depression."

A spokesman for GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Seroxat, said the authors had failed to acknowledge the "very positive" benefits of the treatment and their conclusions were "at odds with what has been seen in actual clinical practice".

He added: "This analysis has only examined a small subset of the total data available while regulatory bodies around the world have conducted extensive reviews and evaluations of all the data available, and this one study should not be used to cause unnecessary alarm and concern for patients."


Meditation changes temperatures

April 18, 2002
y William J. Cromie

Mind controls body in extreme experiments

Buddhist monk meditating
A Buddhist monk has his vital signs measured as he prepares to enter an advanced state of meditation in Normandy, France. During meditation, the monk's body produces enough heat to dry cold, wet sheets put over his shoulders in a frigid room (Photo courtesy of Herbert Benson).

In a monastery in northern India, thinly clad Tibetan monks sat quietly in a room where the temperature was a chilly 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Using a yoga technique known as g Tum-mo, they entered a state of deep meditation. Other monks soaked 3-by-6-foot sheets in cold water (49 degrees) and placed them over the meditators' shoulders. For untrained people, such frigid wrappings would produce uncontrolled shivering.

If body temperatures continue to drop under these conditions, death can result. But it was not long before steam began rising from the sheets. As a result of body heat produced by the monks during meditation, the sheets dried in about an hour.

Attendants removed the sheets, then covered the meditators with a second chilled, wet wrapping. Each monk was required to dry three sheets over a period of several hours.

Why would anyone do this? Herbert Benson, who has been studying g Tum-mo for 20 years, answers that "Buddhists feel the reality we live in is not the ultimate one. There's another reality we can tap into that's unaffected by our emotions, by our everyday world. Buddhists believe this state of mind can be achieved by doing good for others and by meditation. The heat they generate during the process is just a by-product of g Tum-mo meditation."

Benson is an associate professor of medicine at the Harvard Medical School and president of the Mind/Body Medical Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He firmly believes that studying advanced forms of meditation "can uncover capacities that will help us to better treat stress-related illnesses."

Benson developed the "relaxation response," which he describes as "a physiological state opposite to stress." It is characterized by decreases in metabolism, breathing rate, heart rate, and blood pressure. He and others have amassed evidence that it can help those suffering from illnesses caused or exacerbated by stress. Benson and colleagues use it to treat anxiety, mild and moderate depression, high blood pressure, heartbeat irregularities, excessive anger, insomnia, and even infertility. His team also uses this type of simple meditation to calm those who have been traumatized by the deaths of others, or by diagnoses of cancer or other painful, life-threatening illnesses.

"More than 60 percent of visits to physicians in the United States are due to stress-related problems, most of which are poorly treated by drugs, surgery, or other medical procedures," Benson maintains.

The Mind/Body Medical Institute is now training people to use the relaxation response to help people working at Ground Zero in New York City, where two airplanes toppled the World Trade Center Towers last Sept. 11. Facilities have been set up at nearby St. Paul's Chapel to aid people still working on clearing wreckage and bodies. Anyone else who feels stressed by those terrible events can also obtain help at the chapel. "We are training the trainers who work there," Benson says.

The relaxation response involves repeating a word, sound, phrase, or short prayer while disregarding intrusive thoughts. "If such an easy-to-master practice can bring about the remarkable changes we observe," Benson notes. "I want to investigate what advanced forms of meditation can do to help the mind control physical processes once thought to be uncontrollable."

Breathtaking results

Some Westerners practice g Tum-mo, but it often takes years to reach states like those achieved by Buddhist monks. In trying to find groups he could study, Benson met Westerners who claimed to have mastered such advanced techniques, but who were, in his words, "fraudulent."

Benson decided that he needed to locate a religious setting, where advanced mediation is traditionally practiced. His opportunity came in 1979 when the Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of Tibet, visited Harvard University. "His Holiness agreed to help me," recalls Benson. That visit was the beginning of a long friendship and several expeditions to northern India where many Tibetan monks live in exile.

During visits to remote monasteries in the 1980s, Benson and his team studied monks living in the Himalayan Mountains who could, by g Tum-mo meditation, raise the temperatures of their fingers and toes by as much as 17 degrees. It has yet to be determined how the monks are able to generate such heat.

The researchers also made measurements on practitioners of other forms of advanced meditation in Sikkim, India. They were astonished to find that these monks could lower their metabolism by 64 percent. "It was an astounding, breathtaking [no pun intended] result," Benson exclaims.

To put that decrease in perspective, metabolism, or oxygen consumption, drops only 10-15 percent in sleep and about 17 percent during simple meditation. Benson believes that such a capability could be useful for space travel. Travelers might use meditation to ease stress and oxygen consumption on long flights to other planets.

In 1985, the meditation team made a video of monks drying cold, wet sheets with body heat. They also documented monks spending a winter night on a rocky ledge 15,000 feet high in the Himalayas. The sleep-out took place in February on the night of the winter full moon when temperatures reached zero degrees F. Wearing only woolen or cotton shawls, the monks promptly fell asleep on the rocky ledge, They did not huddle together and the video shows no evidence of shivering. They slept until dawn then walked back to their monastery.

Overcoming obstacles

Working in isolated monasteries in the foothills of the Himalayas proved extremely difficult. Some religious leaders keep their meditative procedures a closely guarded secret. Medical measuring devices require electrical power and wall outlets are not always available. In addition, trying to meditate while strangers attempt to measure your rectal temperature is not something most monks are happy to do.

To avoid these problems, Instructor in Psychology Sara Lazar, a Benson colleague, used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan the brains of meditators at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The subjects were males, aged 22-45, who had practiced a form of advanced mediation called Kundalini daily for at least four years. In these experiments, the obstacles of cold and isolation were replaced by the difficulties of trying to meditate in a cramped, noisy machine. However, the results, published in the May 15, 2000, issue of the journal NeuroReport, turned out to be significant.

Herbert Benson
Herbert Benson, who developed a simple relaxation technique to reduce stress, enjoys a quiet moment at a placid stream near his office in Boston. He directs a study of advanced meditation to uncover capabilities that may help treat stress-related illnesses. (Staff photo by Kris Snibbe)

"Lazar found a marked decrease in blood flow to the entire brain," Benson explains. "At the same time, certain areas of the brain became more active, specifically those that control attention and autonomic functions like blood pressure and metabolism. In short, she showed the value of using this method to record changes in the brain's activity during meditation."

The biggest obstruction in further studies, whether in India or Boston, has always been money. Research proceeded slowly and intermittently until February 2001, when Benson's team received a $1.25 million grant from Loel Guinness, via the beer magnate's Kalpa Foundation, established to study extraordinary human capacities.

The funds enabled researchers to bring three monks experienced in g Tum-mo to a Guinness estate in Normandy, France, last July. The monks then practiced for 100 days to reach their full meditative capacity. An eye infection sidelined one of the monks, but the other two proved able to dry frigid, wet sheets while wearing sensors that recorded changes in heat production and metabolism.

Although the team obtained valuable data, Benson concludes that "the room was not cold enough to do the tests properly." His team will try again this coming winter with six monks. They will start practice in late summer and should be ready during the coldest part of winter.

Benson feels sure these attempts to understand advanced mediation will lead to better treatments for stress-related illnesses. "My hope," he says, "is that self-care will stand equal with medical drugs, surgery, and other therapies that are now used to alleviate mental and physical suffering. Along with nutrition and exercise, mind/body approaches can be part of self-care practices that could save millions of dollars annually in medical costs."

Here the heart
May give a useful lesson to the head.

- Cowper


domingo, 21 de dezembro de 2008

Way Of The Infinite Explorer

December 14, 2008

How do you disempower a corrupt system? By empowering yourself. How do you awaken a sleeping population? By awakening yourself. How do you heal a toxic society? By healing yourself.

The arcane chronicles of consciousness have been kept from man since the last reboot of civilization, a few thousand years ago. One of the many teachings hidden therein is the truth that every conscious entity in the universe is connected to all other conscious entities, wherever (and whenever) they may be. No thing is separate from any thing. Every intimate thought and subtle reflection is, in actuality, beamed throughout the entire ecosystem. In this way, deepening your awareness is the most noble and dedicated endeavour conceivable.

It is futile to take it upon oneself to rouse a sleeping population, to attempt to rally the spiritually undead. Trying to connect unprepared minds to paradigm-cracking information is a vain indulgence. Those who prefer not to reflect upon their existence, who feel their needs, motivations and cultural references are fully served by the matrix, should be left alone. Leave them to their TV, evening news, shopping and sport. Drifting in the comfortable oblivion of the consensus trance. One day, they may eventually see through it and take their own first steps on the inner path. Maybe in a future lifetime.

Philosopher and ethnobotanist Terence McKenna would often say, “find the others”. By this he meant be aware of and seek out those fine souls who are also on the inner journey. They are the ones we should give time to. They are the ones equipped to take in new information, eager for gnosis and prepared to evolve their psyches. Amongst the others, the wider tribe, communication can be free and deep. Share, support and learn from each other. In 2008, connecting with the others, through blogs like this, through podcasts and radio shows like Red Ice, The C-Realm, The Psychedelic Salon (and many more), through conferences and gatherings - it has never been easier. I encourage everyone to make the extra effort to reach out. There is usually a warm and encouraging welcome on the other side. The universe has a habit of extending its supportive synchronicities out to you in direct correlation with the amount of effort you put in.

No single system or teacher has everything you need. Not the guy in the robes, or the guy with the bullhorn. Not the cross-legged bald guy or the bearded ponytail guy. No-one who walks the path of transcendent wisdom will ever ask you to follow them. Many who have been on the path for a long time agree on one thing: it is always somehow an essentially personal journey. Customized and unique. There are no shortcuts. Why would you want to curtail your own sacred journey?

Higher Dimensions Require Higher Awareness

Everything that is, vibrates. Each different configuration of vibration creates a form, and we give names to those forms. They are what Lao-Tzu called the ten thousand things. All the stuff of the world. Trees, cars, oranges, iPods. Some things are not things as we ordinarily think of them. Things like awareness, fascination, fear, love, joy, melancholy. But they are things all the same. Forms within the illusion. Vibrations within the matrix.

The Illuminist labyrinth of conspiracy, black-ops and corporate corruption is a thing, a thing of low vibration. A time-loop of unconsciousness. Not somewhere to dwell in the long term. Giving enduring focus to it will eventually leave you resonating at the same super low levels and it will be a major feat to shake them off. The blade becomes blunt, the vitality fades. Live in Mordor too long and you come out looking like Gollum. Go in, do the reconnaissance and get out.

We know the world government is moving from covert to overt control. No more skulking around in the shadows for them. This time it’s broad daylight in-your-face fascism. Global financial markets are being made to haemorrhage in order for national economies to credibly implode. Then the Control System can implement its mandate of radical centralization. Militarization of key command structures will follow, ushered in by quasi-natural disasters, social unrest and false-flag terror. It's all there in the Control System official broadcasts (mainstream news) every day.

Consider this statement from globalist sorcerer Henry Kissinger in 1991, “Today, America would be outraged if U.N. troops entered Los Angeles to restore order. Tomorrow they will be grateful. This is especially true if they were told that there were an outside threat from beyond, whether real or promulgated, that threatened our very existence. It is then that all peoples of the world will plead to deliver them from this evil. The one thing every man fears is the unknown. When presented with this scenario, individual rights will be willingly relinquished for the guarantee of their well-being granted to them by the World Government.”

For researchers who anchor themselves exclusively to the unveiling process, it is a demanding time right now. Torrents of disclosure and revelation are manifesting in increasing volumes. Some observers have even fallen foul of sharing their personal visions in public arenas, either as dire prophetic warnings or glorious cosmic occurrences. Ill-advised in the extreme, regardless of intention. It’s deceptively simple to burn up all one’s conscious juice in charting the gloomy corridors of Illuminist corruption, hunting down that ever-elusive minotaur. But the minotaur is a phantom. It doesn’t exist. The enemy is within. No.6 is No.1.

The main game is the dimensional shift. Not the spasms of the Control System. You must choose which to pour your energy into.

A cautionary tale. Those dominated by their own unobserved egoic mind often wander into the conspiracy wilderness without the necessary equipment. They are predictably pounced on by the shape-shifting phantoms of paranoia, depression, anxiety, panic, messianic delusion and hostility. Maybe even accosted by actual agents of the Control System who spot them a mile off. Nevertheless, at a deep level, they are all conjurations that cannot exist without the consenting mind. In extreme cases, some individuals may develop a clinical condition referred to as a psychogenic fugue – a colossal existential breakdown. The fugue state is characterized in the individual by the wilful abandonment of previous identity, memories and personality. In short, the old life of misery is jettisoned and replaced with a new fantasy life. The subject transforms himself from Mr. Nobody into Mr. Somebody. Such serious and complex neuropsychological processes are usually triggered by the resurfacing of an intense earlier life trauma which threatens to induce unbearable distress. The fugue state can thus be considered an emergency armouring mechanism to protect a deeply damaged psyche from any further suffering.

The Finger Pointing At The Moon

Whether written or spoken, words can only suggest meaning.

The eastern proverb of the finger pointing at the moon highlights this beautifully: “All instruction is but a finger pointing to the moon; and those whose gaze is fixed upon the pointer will never see beyond.” If you confuse the pointer with the thing that it is actually pointing to, your perception is short-circuited and flawed. You're looking at the wrong thing. Seems obvious? Consider science as an example of flawed perception.

Science is a way of looking at the world. The description it offers is not reality itself, it is a representation of reality. A very useful and pragmatic one. Yet the larger part of the scientific community, and certainly the entire mainstream media, are serving up scientific description as reality itself. This is like confusing the sheet music that provides musical notation for a Mozart piano sonata with Mozart’s actual music itself. It is not the music. Perhaps only a handful of virtuoso pianists have understood the music as it was originally conceived. Truly felt it, become one with it and thus became an authentic conduit to express and realize it.

Perceiving this simple but crucial distinction helps to pierce the consensus veil of unreality.

Let us clarify some terminology used here. Consciousness. We become more conscious in the sense that we bring higher awareness into our living experience. Awareness of self, of others, detachment from the egoic mind and connection to the universal flow of consciousness that interpenetrates everything. Knowing not thinking. The ten thousand things lose their pull. So it follows that low consciousness, or even unconsciousness, indicates a lack of awareness, and a necessarily mesmerizing identification with the lower instincts of egoic materialism. For low consciousness people, the ten thousand things exert tremendous pull.

In some circles, consciousness is what used to be called spirit. It is the sentience of the universe. The Tao. The holy spirit. The divine force. The mind conducts consciousness like music. It requires both technical and creative ability. Brain and heart. Too much of one or too little of another and it sounds all weird and discordant. Get the balance just right and you produce something truly exquisite. The conscious human experience is like this. From time to time, everything gears up for a new score. Seeking to move from the restraints of the current auditorium, which is becoming an impediment to the music, to a substantially larger dimensional arena. A natural progression to allow the music to expand and mature.

This is echoed in the idea that our ancient ancestors did not experience consciousness in the same way we do. Perhaps not even at all.

Julian Jaynes stated, in his magnum opus, 'The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind' (1976), that the ancients did not possess an introspective conscious mind space. Their conduct and communication was aligned with auditory and visual messaging from a non-local field. Jaynes called this mode of thinking the bicameral mind and suggests that a shift to individual consciousness occurred about 3,000 years ago. Jaynes reflected that the change was due to the development of symbolic language and the written word. I conjecture that this may also have coincided with significant earth changes and a natural differentiation of consciousness before the next integration stage. The oil and water separate. Divergence.

Solutions to all matrix/NWO propaganda are inside. Not outside. In our being. Not anywhere else. There is nowhere else. The journey into the heart of one’s own being provides the solutions to all the matrix phantasms you can imagine. If you already know that, read on. If you don’t already know that, read on. If you find that hard to believe and don’t wish to consider any alternatives, go and watch TV and forget about it.

Tracking Emergent Systems

Scientists can only ever take the baton so far - Newton and Einstein took it a long way - but they can only run so far, for so long. Then someone else has to take things forward. Seems fair enough? Covering a good distance, furthering the knowledge and expanding the territory are the best and most noble achievements one can hope for. Yet expectations of universal theories and ultimate particles are naïvely and unconsciously pursued. This relentless delusion is much encouraged by the Control System as it keeps the people away from the glorious nature of the ever unfolding and deepening universe.

In mainstream science, the implications of quantum theory have certainly caused the most trouble to classical empiricist thinking, rather than the actual findings themselves.

A prime example is physicist Alain Aspect’s 1982 experiment in a Paris lab where he revealed that subatomic particles are able to instantaneously communicate with each other at vast distances. They communicate instantly, each particle knowing what the other is doing, regardless of physical separation. Nicknamed 'spooky action at a distance', Aspect’s findings indicated that basic assumptions about the physical makeup of reality might be wrong. Wrong all over. With spooky action, somehow each particle always seems to know what the other is doing - instantly. Even if they are separated by a billion miles. The problem with this is that it violates Einstein's long-held tenet that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light, as faster than light travel is effectively time travel (a disturbing prospect for reductionist minds). This daunting vision caused many physicists to desperately devise elaborate theories to explain away Aspect's findings. To box them off into the ‘Unknown: Leave well alone’ category. Happily, and much more constructively, it inspired others to offer up even more innovative explanations.

For University Of London physicist David Bohm, Aspect’s work was further evidence that the world of objects, space and separation does not exist. It is all a hologram, or, as Bohm dubbed it, a holomovement. To help explain why Bohm can confidently make this startling assertion, let us pin down precisely what a hologram is.

A hologram is a three dimensional photograph where the object to be photographed is bathed in a laser beam. A second laser beam is bounced off the reflected light of the first and the resulting interference pattern (where the two laser beams cross) is captured on film. When that film is developed, it looks like a meaningless swirl of weird lines. But when the developed film is illuminated by another laser beam, a three-dimensional image of the original object appears.

When I was a kid, I would sometimes see little hologram stickers for sale in novelty/joke shops. When you turned them toward the light, the two dimensional surface would reveal what appeared to be a window into another world, in which a little rocket, or a face, or a guitar would sit in glorious three dimensional space. This fascinated me.

As well as their dimension defying properties, holograms have another extraordinary characteristic; and this is the property that speaks of the construction of the whole universe. Let’s take the example of the little guitar hologram sticker. If I cut the hologram in half and then illuminate it with a laser, each half will still be found to contain the entire image of the guitar. Cut each piece in half again, and again and again, and still the fragment of film will always contain a smaller but complete version of the original image. Each fragment encoded with the design of the whole.

This insight inspired Bohm to another way of understanding Aspect's discovery. Bohm believed the reason subatomic particles are able to remain in contact with one another regardless of the distance separating them, is not because they are sending some weird light-speed signal back and forth, but because their separateness is an illusion. He argues that at a deeper level of reality such particles are not individual entities, but extensions of the same fundamental entity.

Bohm offers the following illustration to clarify this. Imagine an aquarium containing a fish. You cannot see the aquarium directly – all your knowledge about it comes from two television cameras, one directed at the aquarium's front and the other directed at its side. As you stare at the two television monitors, you might assume that the fish on each of the screens are two entirely separate entities. After all, the cameras are set at different angles and each fish appears to behave differently. One swims left to right, the other swims toward you and away from you. However, when you watch the fish closely, you eventually become aware that there’s a certain relationship between them. When one turns, the other also turns. Different angles but definitely corresponding. Without awareness of the aquarium and the cameras, you might assume that the fish must be instantaneously communicating with one another.

For Bohm, this is exactly what’s occurring between subatomic particles in Aspect's experiment. Every particle is connected to every other. Part of one whole dynamic 4D membrane. Everything interpenetrates everything else. There is no separation. Ancient mystical traditions repackaged. All is one. Not only does each bit of the hologram contain the code for the whole, it also deepens to include the entire construct of what we call past, present and future. Everything is existent at once. Moving your laser of consciousness over it gives the appearance of the passage of time.

The Attitude Of The Impeccable Warrior

In November 2008, Stephan Dürr and a team from the John von Neumann Institute for Computing (Jülich, Germany) concluded that what we call matter is merely the energy from vacuum fluctuations*. That is, the apparently substantial stuff that makes up the world is actually no more than fluctuations in the quantum vacuum, the energy interactions from little theoretical particles popping in and out of our dimension.

Strange how this wasn’t headline news with CNN, ABC, Fox, BBC, Sky etc. There is no matter, it's all energy fizzing away in the quantum vacuum. Instead the headlines were about money, murder and sport. The usual. Where this exciting physics did get mainstream coverage, the reporting was filled with patronizing wry smiles, condescending language and a sentiment that resonated ‘this is beyond your little world so shut the fuck up and watch Desperate Housewives instead’.

These fantastic new observations (arrived at running quantum chromodynamics equations through a super computer over a year) are another clear illustration that there really is no concrete world out there. What we perceive is a dance of energy. Vibrations intoned by a myriad frequencies and wavelengths. It is similar to the spectral charts produced by mapping the acoustic properties of sound waves, particularly in music. See the attached picture I created from just looking at some beautiful guitar music through a spectral analyzer. Is this what music really is? Sacred use of entheogens gives inner explorers the vision to see music in this way. Reality is just the same.

As Michael Talbot points out in his superb book, 'The Holographic Universe', many ESP type phenomena make perfect sense in the holographic model. People with more unhindered and free roaming lasers (of consciousness) are simply accessing different non-local pieces of information by focussing on non-ordinary parts of the hologram.

Depending on social and cultural parameters, such trans-temporal non-ordinary holographic reading might be called magic, sorcery, or a miracle, or just a coincidence – depending on your belief system. People wrap their experiences in the most compelling and immediate cultural constructs available to them.

Bohm: “Dividing the universe up into living and nonliving things has no meaning… Even a rock is in some way alive… for life and intelligence are present not only in all of matter, but in energy, space, time, the fabric of the entire universe.”

The universe is seeking to bring deeper and fuller consciousness into itself. All energy configurations, all animal, mineral and vegetable entities contribute.

This is the main game. The dimensional shift is another evolutionary augmentation in the divine cycle.

This is what the Control System really doesn’t want you to think about. It undoes a lot of the hard work they've put into containing your thought. They’d much rather see you carrying banners around central London or downtown New York with anti-NWO slogans and giving out pamphlets. Ranting on radio shows. They love that. They look down from their penthouses smiling, smoking cigars, eating small rodents and wondering why the hell the dumb humans still haven’t gotten onto the real game.

Want to fight the NWO? Unplug from the matrix? Then let nothing be a barrier to your own spiritual growth and transcendence. Work on yourself and be committed. Display the spirit of the impeccable warrior in every moment. Seek wholeness not fragmentation. Understand that the only thing that is real is your conscious experience. Do not resist change. Make change become your change. Outdo them at their own game.

The spiral of creation is not static. It is a living, evolving, emergent system of extreme creativity. Hence, gnosis is a moving target. Walking its path is a nomadic life. When night falls, you pitch your tent. In the morning, you pack it up, put it on your back and start walking again. Don’t pitch it anywhere permanently.

Be the infinite explorer.

References & Footnotes

Images. (1) 'Shapeshifter' by Susan Seddon Boulet. (2) An image from the movie Labyrinth [1986]. (3) 'Moon of Enlightenment' by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi. (4) Basic particle structures. (5) David Bohm, emerging from the matrix. (6) Spectral analysis of an audio clip of 'Benighted' by Opeth. (7) 'Galaxy Of Gold' by Baddad.


Matter is merely vacuum fluctuations.


The Last of the Zoroastrians

December 09, 2008
By Deena Guzder

Zoroastrians pray around a fireplace June 16, 2001 in their temple in the village of Chak Chak during their annual pilgrimage.
Zoroastrians pray around a fireplace inside their temple in the village of Chak Chak.
Reuter / Corbis

Far removed from Tehran's bustling tin-roofed teashops and Isfahan's verdant pomegranate gardens, the deserts known as Dasht-e Kavir and Dasht-e Lut meet at the city of Yazd, once the heart of the Persian Empire.

Walking across the wind-whipped plains of the forgotten city, a young Iranian woman dressed in colorful floral garbs points out a sand-dusted tower hovering in the distance like a dormant volcano under a relentless sun. "This is where we put tens of thousands of corpses over the years," she explains with a congenial smile.

The funerary tower is part of the ancient burial practice of Zoroastrianism, the world's oldest monotheistic religion. Zoroastrians (known in India as Parsis) regard sky burials, in which the bodies are exposed to natural elements including vultures in open-topped "Towers of Silence," as an ecologically friendly alternative to cremation, consistent with their religion's reverence for the earth. A Zoroastrian priest clad in a long, cotton robe explains: "Death is considered to be the work of Angra Mainyu, the embodiment of all that is evil, whereas the earth and all that is beautiful is considered to be the pure work of God. We must not pollute the earth with our remains."

The priest believes that open burials are a fulfillment of the central tenet of his religion, which is to practice good deeds. With a forlorn expression, he notes that, 3,000 years after the tradition of open burials began, there are not enough Zoroastrians left alive to keep the tower in Yazd open. Instead, today's Zoroastrians who want to observe traditional burial practices must request in their will that their body is sent to a forested suburb in Mumbai, India, where the last Tower of Silence still operates.

In the alabaster prayer room of the Zoroastrian temple in the center of Yazd, a handful of adherents sway to the cadence of ancient Persian prayers recited as a priest feeds sticks of sandalwood and sprinkles of frankincense into a blazing urn. Zoroastrians wear hand-woven wool cords as external symbols of their faith, and almost always pray in front of a fire, which represents purity and sustainability. In Yazd, the holy flame has burned for 1,500 years without ever being extinguished. While Zoroastrianism was once the dominant religion in a swathe of territory spanning from Rome and Greece to India and Russia, the number of adherents has dwindled exponentially over the centuries. Although Yazd is the birthplace of the religion, only 200 of its 433,836 people still practice Zoroastrianism because migration, forced conversions, and centuries of oppression have diminished the population.

Worldwide, there are 190,000 Zoroastrians at most, and perhaps as few as 124,000 by some estimates. Although Zoroastrians are few in number, their faith has influenced Judaism, Christianity and Islam with its teachings of a single deity, a dualistic universe of good versus evil, and a final day of reckoning. The religion professes that humankind is designed to evolve toward perfection, but is complicated by evil forces such as greed, lust and hatred, explains Mehraban Firouzgary, the head priest of the Zoroastrian temple in Tehran. According to Zoroastrians, these evil forces must be challenged proactively by developing a "good mind" that embraces a life of good thoughts, good words and good deeds.

Despite their shrinking population, Zoroastrians remain fiercely divided over whether to recognize interfaith families, let alone accept non-generational Zoroastrians. Tens of thousands fled Persia during the Islamic incursions in the 10th Century and were granted refuge in India under the condition they did not marry outside their faith or proselytize to the Hindu majority. Ramiyar P. Karanjia, principal of a Zoroastrian religious school in Mumbai, India, insists, "Conversion is not part of our religion." Yet, in India, home to the majority of Zoroastrians, the community is declining by about 10% every decennial census, according to a report released by UNESCO. Today, Zoroastrians remain a tight-knit and self-secluded community that strongly encourages marriage within the faith.

According to Parva Namiranian, a Zoroastrian medical student at Tehran University, the community in Iran preserves its identity by learning the Persian poetry of the Shah Nameh and holding religious classes and celebrations. She says Zoroastrians are accepted in Iran because they "represent a proud history" and all Iranians, regardless of religion, enjoy celebrating the Zoroastrian New Year, Nowruz, because it's an excuse to buy clothes and eat sweets. Mehraban Firouzgary, the head priest in the Zoroastrian temple in Tehran, agrees that most Iranians regard the Zoroastrian minority favorably, but he worries about the community's survival. "Zoroastrians have lived in Iran for over 3,000 years," he says, "but there are so few left today."


The One-Minute Cure for Virtually Any Disease... including Cancer

December 2008
By Madison Cavanaugh

Preventing and curing disease is just a matter of identifying the cause of disease -- and getting rid of it. It's really that simple!

What complicates the process of curing disease is that everybody has a different opinion as to what the cause of disease is.

1. Some say viruses are the culprit [e.g., the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) causes AIDS; the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) causes cervical cancer; the Influenza virus causes the flu, and so on].

2. Some insist that it's microbes, germs or harmful bacteria that cause disease.

3. Some say it's the toxins in the food we eat, the air we breathe and the substances we consume that cause disease (e.g., carcinogens, neurotoxins, heavy metals and toxic chemicals).

4. Still others say it's our genes that make us susceptible to acquiring one disease or another.

5. And then, of course, there are those that believe that the "mother" of all diseases is stress.

Which of the above do you think is the correct answer? If you picked one or more of the 5 causes of disease listed above, your answer is incorrect. While all of the above do characterize most diseases, or might be precursors of disease, they do not cause disease.

For example, viruses, microbes, germs and harmful bacteria do not cause disease. They do "seek their natural habitat -- diseased tissue -- rather than being the cause of the diseased tissue; e.g., mosquitoes seek the stagnant water, but do not cause the pool to become stagnant." This is according to the famed "Father of Pathology," Dr. Rudolf Virchow.

Likewise, germs, bacteria, viruses and pathogens do not cause disease, but rather seek out environments where they can thrive best -- and that is in oxygen-deprived bodies.

Neither do toxins, genes and stress cause disease. Rather, they bring about a condition in the body (oxygen deficiency) that, in turn, causes disease.

The One-Minute Cure is the first book that provides solid proof that the primary physical cause of all diseases is linked in one way or another to oxygen deficiency. In fact, many of the elaborate (and expensive) therapies offered by organized medicine take advantage of oxygen's effect on diseased cells. Most conventional cancer therapies, for instance, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy, produce oxygen-activated events that kill cancer cells. Another new cancer drug, verteporfin, increases the amount of oxygen within cancerous tumors, and this kills tumors more effectively than radiation alone. Interferon drugs, which are vastly prescribed for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, owe their efficacy to the fact that they raise the body's oxygen level.

It's safe to conclude that many drugs basically work on the same principle of oxygenation described in The One-Minute Cure -- but those drugs cost tens of thousands of times more than the one-minute, pennies-a-day, self-administered therapy presented in the book.

Furthermore, the one-minute cure does not come with any of the adverse effects typically associated with toxic drugs and other radical medical therapies.

There are numerous oxygen-based natural therapies being offered for the prevention and so-called "cure" of disease, such as oxygenated water, oxygen-rich foods or supplements, or treatments that release oxygen into the bloodstream. But they are not always effective in treating disease. While they may deliver oxygen to the blood, they don't have an efficient mechanism for breaking the oxygen free from the hemoglobin molecules in the blood, which means the oxygen is not delivered to the cells and tissues. Only when oxygen is delivered to the body's cells and tissues can it eradicate disease.

The simple therapy described in The One-Minute Cure is the only one that uses a natural oxygenating substance which stimulates the movement of oxygen atoms from the BLOODSTREAM to the CELLS to a dramatically greater degree than is usually reached by all other means.

It does this by increasing oxygen and hemoglobin disassociation, thereby maximizing the delivery of oxygen from the blood to the cells, according to a prominent doctor best known for treating AIDS patients with a holistic protocol which includes oxygen therapy. Therefore, the one-minute cure is -- hands down -- the best health insurance anyone can have because although it doesn't provide coverage in the event you get sick, it does something better -- it prevents you from getting sick in the first place. If you already have a disease, the one-minute cure brings your body to an oxygen-rich state where disease can neither survive or thrive.

Thus, when you eliminate the CAUSE of virtually all diseases, it is literally impossible to get sick!

The one-minute cure is the only healing modality that effectively eliminates the REAL cause of disease -- and the best part is that it can be self-administered at home, is safe to use, costs only 1-1/2 cents per day, and has no adverse effects when used properly.

Wouldn't you want to give yourself this kind of health insurance, and give it as a gift to everyone you care about?

One-Minute Cure for CancerMadison Cavanaugh is the author of “The One-Minute Cure: The Secret to Healing Virtually All Diseases,” which reveals a scientifically proven therapy that creates a condition in the body where disease can neither survive or thrive – and enables the body to heal itself of cancer and many other diseases.

Click here to learn more about the
One Minute Cure...


$2-Billion Mind-Control Lawsuit

December 11, 2008
by Lyle Zapato

A Cascadian man, Jerry Rose, is suing Wal-Mart, Microsoft, Telus, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and others for $2-billion over allegations of mind-control, satanic rituals, and witchcraft:

Rose's claim states "that he has been subject to invasive brain computer interface technology, research, experiments, field studies and surgery" and also named the University of B.C. and the B.C. College of Physicians and Surgeons as defendants.

B.C. judge Fraser Wilson bravely broke with his Federalist handlers and refused the defendants' call to have the case summarily thrown out, citing CIA-sponsored experiments at the McGill University hospital in Montreal in the 1950-60s -- in which people were given LSD without their consent in an attempt to wipe out their sense of "self" and rebuild their identities to CIA specifications -- as reason to give Rose's claims a fair hearing. The lawyer for Microsoft however called Rose's case "nothing short of bizarre" and a "nuisance lawsuit", arguing that there is "no scientific evidence to prove brain control is a possibility" -- which is exactly what lawyers for brain-controllers would say.

While searching for additional information on Jerry Rose to flesh out this post beyond my merely quoting and rephrasing some news article like so many other lazy bloggers (I couldn't find any), I came across this blog post by Matt Beal: "bizarre mind-control atrocity exposed, part 1". Beal mentions a different Jerry Rose who is a retired professor of Sociology from SUNY Fredonia, New York, and former publisher of the JFK assassination research journals The Third Decade and The Fourth Decade.

What makes this noteworthy is that Beal's post is largely about conspiratorial onomatology, or "the science of names", a theory that unusual synchronicities of names can be found around various conspiracies, particularly Masonic ones. These synchronicities are orchestrated by those behind conspiracies to taunt targets and researchers, which Beal has experienced first-hand:

This was a way for the Illuminati to reveal to me that I had been targeted by a mind-control program without coming right out and telling me. In other words, it was designed to be plausibly deniable, but at the same time, to leave no doubt in my mind what was going on and who was behind the program. Arrogance is one of the Illuminati's weaknesses. They are so proud of themselves and so anxious to demonstrate how powerful they are, that they leave their fingerprints all over the place.


I can give hundreds of examples of how the science of names connects my life to the JFK assassination, ritual abuse, mind control, satanic cults, Nazi Germany, the Philadelphia Experiment, the Montauk Project, extraterrestrials and other strange phenomena.

As far as I can determine, the pattern of placing people around me whose names are identical or similar to the names of people involved in these subjects started in 1965, the year I turned 10 years old. But it reached its peak in 1998, the year I took a job on the metro desk of the Daily Southtown in Tinley Park, Ill.

[He goes on to list numerous examples.]

And the name of the blog where this was posted? Brussell Sprout! Supposedly named in honor of conspiracy researcher Mae Brussell, yet sounding like a certain vegetable promoted by an organization I have been vocal in fighting against, the Belgian Conspiracy. Coincidence? To quote Jerry Rose (the one from New York, not the one from Cascadia):

"The question, as always, is that of the point at which the reasonable mind rebels at accepting a host of coincidences and begins to demand that we look for the conspiratorial agency behind all these 'coincidental' happenings."

Hopefully Jerry Rose (the one from Cascadia, not the one from New York) will be able to use the mind-controllers' weakness -- their arrogant need to plant hidden name-references -- against them when his case comes to trial. Hint to Mr. Rose the former: Microsoft hired Jerry Seinfeld as a spokescelebrity. Seinfeld's previous major project was a movie about CGI bees. Bees like flowers. A Rose is a flower! The rest of your case writes itself.


Blame game: My name made me do it

November 15, 2008
By Sharon Jayson

Your name made you do it, albeit unconsciously, suggests new research that finds your name can negatively undermine your goals.

Psychologists in marketing at Yale and the University of California, San Diego studying the unconscious influence of names say a preference for our own names and initials — the "name-letter effect" — can have some negative consequences.

Students whose names begin with C or D get lower grades than those whose names begin with A or B; major league baseball players whose first or last names began with K (the strikeout-signifying letter) are significantly more likely to strike out, according to the report published in the December issue of Psychological Science.

"We found that our own-name liking sabotages success for people whose initials match negative performance labels," the report says.

Assistant professors Leif Nelson of UCSD and Joseph Simmons of Yale conducted five studies over five years (including one lab experiment) using information from thousands of individuals: 6,398 baseball players (377 had K as either a first or last initial); 15,000 MBA students; 294 undergraduate students; 170 law schools with more than 390,000 lawyers; and 284 participants in their laboratory experiment.

"The conscious process is baseball players want to get a hit and students want to get A's," Nelson says. "So if you get a change in performance consistent with the name-letter effect, it clearly shows there must be some unconscious desire operating in the other direction."

The researchers' work supports a series of studies published since 2002 that have found the "name-letter effect" causes people to make life choices based on names that resemble their own. Those studies by Brett Pelham, an associate professor of psychology at SUNY University at Buffalo, have found that people are disproportionately likely to live in states or cities resembling their names, have careers that resemble their names and even marry those whose surnames begin with the same letter as their own.

"If this is an unconscious preference, it suggests we don't really have free will about certain important decisions," Pelham says. "We don't really make those decisions for the reasons we thought we did."

The twist, Pelham says, is that he has believed the name-letter effect would apply only to positive outcomes. Nelson and Simmons, he says, are "showing it applies more so to negative things than positive things."

In the first study of baseball players, Nelson and Simmons pored over 93 years of statistics for players who had at least 100 plate appearances. The second study looked at 15 years of grades for MBA students, but they did not use F because not all schools use that designation.

The study did find that those with initials of A or B don't perform any better, though. Another study of law school admissions found lesser-rated schools had a smaller proportion of lawyers with name initials A and B. The lab experiment used an anagram test that confirmed the previous studies.

The researchers say the effect is definitely more than coincidence but is small nevertheless.

"I know plenty of Chrises and Davids who have done very well in school," Simmons says.